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    Fall & Winter Veggies to plant now

    by  • October 30, 2017 • Adria's Garden Blog, In the Greenery • 0 Comments


    VEGETABLES:
    Bok Choy, Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Lettuce, Onion, Snap Peas, Shelling Peas, Spinach, Artichoke (seedling), Carrots, Beets, Radishes, Fava Beans, Kale, Mustard greens, Collard greens, turnips and turnip greens.

    All vegetables listed above except Celery, Onions, Peas, Artichokes and Fava beans should be planted in succession 2-4 weeks apart. Succession planting is just repeated plantings to ensure a continued crop since these plants produce 1 primary crop and maybe a small secondary crop then they are finished.

    HERBS: Chives, Fennel, Lemon Balm, Marjoram, Mint, Oregano, Parsley, Rosemary, Thyme. Some of these herbs will die back in the winter if planted outside but planting them in the fall will ensure a larger plant next year which means a bigger harvest!

    Halloween Decor Sale

    by  • October 12, 2017 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

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    begins Thursday, Oct 12, 2017

    40% off

    Halloween Decor

    • includes table top and outdoor decor
    • includes fairy garden and flags
    • Halloween products only ONLY

     

    *Offer good on Halloween Themed Décor only. Everyday items like Lanterns, Pillar candles, candy and food items, fresh pumpkins and faux pumpkins not included. While supplies last.

     

    Fall & Winter Flowers

    by  • September 19, 2017 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

    Fall is a great time to plant annuals in your yard for color all winter long and into spring.

    What to plant you say? Here’s a list of our favorites and how to use them, almost all of them grown locally by Fredriks Nursery!

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    Sweet Peas – known for their sweet fragrance in the spring, sweet peas are often overlooked until they bloom at which time it is too late to plant here in the Central Valley. Best time to plant is in October whether by seed or start for their spring bloom. They will need a fine support system like trellis netting for their delicate little tendrils to wrap around as they grow. Dwarf “self supporting” varieties are available and are great additions to containers or hanging baskets. Grow in part to full sun.

    Calendula a.k.a. Pot Marigold (not pictured) – this annual is the the Marigold of the winter. Considered a mid range -tall growing flower for fall, the bright and cheery flower petals are edible and used in salads, soups and to color soaps and other homemade concoctions. Grow in part to full sun.

    Cyclamen on bench

    Cyclamen – I like to call them the Queens of the Winter. Not really an annual but more like a bulb, Cyclamen give non-stop color until the warm spring days arrive. Available in white, white with purple eye, pink, rose, purple, red, wine red and even in colors flamed with white. Super cute minis are available too. Plant cyclamen in the ground, containers or hanging baskets. Keep them blooming the best with regular fertilizing and deadheading by plucking the entire spent flower stem, do not cut. Grow them in shade, part shade or a cool, sunny spot. When they tire out in the warm days of spring, set them aside in a cool, dry area and water occasionally through the summer. Beginning in September when you see new leaves sprout, water regularly and fertilize and they will come back in to bloom for the winter! (more…)

    Fresh Pumpkins have arrived!!

    by  • September 7, 2017 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

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    Tips for keeping your pumpkins & ornamental squash fresh

    1. Keep them dry – especially underneath. Moisture from below will begin decomposition and rotting.
    2. Do not mar the skin – pumpkins have thick outer skin for protection. If the skin is scraped, scratched or poked the pumpkin will begin to rot.
    3. Don’t waste them – bake them! Many of the pumpkins and ornamental squash are tasty and great for baking after the season.

     

    Happy Pumpkin Season!

    How long should I run my drip system?

    by  • July 31, 2017 • Uncategorized • 0 Comments

    Did you know that drip systems put out VERY LITTLE water at one time? Drip emitters either put out as little as 1/2 gallon and up to 4 gallons of water per hour. This depends on which emitter was purchased and installed. If you are not putting enough water on your plants at each...

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    Blossom Drop on Tomatoes

    by  • June 16, 2017 • Adria's Garden Blog, In the Garden • 0 Comments

    Photo credit: Darla

    Photo credit: Darla

    This time of year we get a lot of questions as to why a vigorous tomato plant does not have any fruit on it. The blossoms drop off right at the “elbow” above the bloom. This is caused by a few different factors.

    1. Extreme temperature swings – Having 20 degree + temperature swings from one day to another can cause this. Obviously this is out of our control.
    2. Lack of calcium, lack of fertilizer or wrong fertilizer – have you fertilized? Maybe you did when you first planted but it might be time to reapply! Check the package for specifications or read our recommendation for fertilizing vegetables, here.  Avoid fertilizers with high nitrogen (the first number on the label). You can also use a supplemental spray to help blossom set. Find it in store.
    3. Lack of pollination – technically tomatoes are self pollinating but sometimes they need a little help. Give the tomato support or cage a gentle shake often times helps.
    4. Too much shade – like any fruiting plant, they need lots of sun to produce. Generally a minimum of 4 hours a day but 6 hours or more is better.
    5. Overwatering – this is generally the problem. Tomatoes, unlike other plants, need to be stressed in order to set fruit. Otherwise you will have large, lush plants and little to no fruit!

    How to water tomato plants

    It is best to keep the leaves dry and only water the plants when they actually begin to wilt, typically every 7-10 days once established. A large plant with lots of fruit may need it every 4-5 days during a heat spell. When watering, do so thoroughly and deeply. Please note, this applies only to tomatoes in the ground. Potted tomato plants will need water more frequently but still only when wilting. However, make sure the plant is wilting in the evening, if it is wilting in the afternoon but looks okay in the evening it doesn’t need water!

    Still not sure? Drop by and speak to one of our experts!