• Got Nutgrass?

    by  • June 16, 2014 • Adria's Garden Blog, In the Garden • 0 Comments

    photo credit: http://www.ktrh.com

    If you’ve had nutgrass, you know what a nuisance it can be. For those who aren’t sure if you have it, you can bring a fresh sample by The Greenery and we can identify it for you!

    What is Nutgrass?

    Nutgrass is a bright green grassy weed that pokes up where ever it prefers. If it is in the lawn you will notice that it is a different color and grows faster than the lawn. You may have tried pulling it only to find more pop up. This weed develops “nutlets” at the end of the roots that stay in the soil when you pull the plant out. A very clever form of self preservation! Each nutlet produces an entirely new plant!

    How to control Nutgrass

    The best way to control it is to use a spray specifically formulated for Nutgrass. If you have tried spraying it before, you’ve noticed that common weed killers don’t even burn it back. This is the best time to spray using the Nutgrass killer  since the weeds are beginning to slow down and save up energy for next year. Nutgrass will die down to the ground in the fall so the last time to get this spray absorbed into the plant is now through mid-September or so. The nice thing about Nutgrass Killer is that it is a very specific herbicide meaning it won’t harm most ornamental plants! I recommend always checking the label though.

    When you spray always use a surfectant. We recommend Herbicide Helper. This is an additive that mixes with the herbicide to make the product stick to the weeds and absorb better. Nutgrass has very narrow, shiny leaves so the sprays typically run right off! After spraying it can take a few weeks before the weeds begin to yellow. If the weeds have more than 5 leaves then you can repeat the spray again at 2 weeks to ensure control.

    What to expect

    When spraying for nutgrass keep in mind that it is not going to kill it instantly. It also will not prevent new plants from growing. The nutlets and seeds can lay dormant for years until the conditions are right for growth. I have heard of it taking a few years or more to control severe infestations.

    If you would like to read further about Nutgrass, I recommend this article.

    Happy Nutgrass Killing!

    -Adria

    About

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *